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Bugs

I didn't realize just how important that bug zapper is.  The bulbs are failing, causing the thing to arc and flicker and generally sound not good, so I unplugged it.

It's been off for about three days and the place is absolutely swarming with bugs.  I just sprayed myself with Off and tried to go outside, then I probably looked like an insane man trying to swat at all the bugs that were all over me.  I just wanted to spend the evening on the front steps, listening to some music and playing with the goatlets, but the bugs sure put the kibosh on that real quick.

I managed to dig up one spare bulb from the old bug zapper, and there should be another, but I can't find it, so I guess I have to go out tomorrow and buy another.  This zapper takes two bulbs and both appear to be failing/failed.

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mondhasen
May. 30th, 2010 02:23 am (UTC)
I just sprayed myself with Off and tried to go outside, then I probably looked like an insane man trying to swat at all the bugs that were all over me.

*laughing* Sounds like a scene from a B film "Get them off! Get them offffff!" ...and then they digest you.

My dad hated his zapper: claimed that it actually attracted bugs from the other yards and that they'd snack on him on their way to being poofed.
captpackrat
May. 30th, 2010 02:42 am (UTC)
The most common mistake people make with bug zappers is to install them right next to the area they're trying to protect, which simply attracts the bugs to that spot. You have to place the zapper as far away as possible so the bugs are drawn away.

The bug zapper here is mounted on the side of the barn, about 30 to 50 yards away from the house. It does a pretty good job of getting rid of most bugs, although it doesn't actually work that well against mosquitoes, unless I install a bait cartridge. Mosquitoes are attracted by scent, not light.
rcoony
May. 30th, 2010 03:25 pm (UTC)
Also, don't those things cause them to explode in a spray of bug guts? I don't think I really want that going on next to where I'm hanging out.
captpackrat
May. 30th, 2010 11:45 pm (UTC)
According to Wikipedia:

Research has shown that when insects are electrocuted bug zappers can spread a mist containing insect parts up to about 7 feet (2.1 m) from the device. The air around the bug zapper can become contaminated by bacteria and viruses that can be inhaled by, or settle on the food of, people in the immediate vicinity. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advise the bug zapper should not be over a food preparation area, and insects should be retained within the device.
bubbycat
Jun. 1st, 2010 12:15 am (UTC)
Hi. what kinda bulbs do those things take? i never had one but I've seen those bug zappers several times riding in a car in the past going down the road at night and they always looked sorta like a old electric stove burner. at leasts in the 1980's when i saw those bug zappers at night glowing sorta blue like they did in the dark when i was riding in a car.
captpackrat
Jun. 1st, 2010 02:59 am (UTC)
Since most bugs can see better in the ultraviolet, they use special black light bulbs. They glow a dark blue.
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