?

Log in

No account? Create an account

Previous Entry | Next Entry

Another dangerous day today.

There is a High Risk of severe thunderstorms this afternoon into tonight over the Mississippi/Ohio River Valley region, including parts of Northeast Arkansas, Western Tennessee, Southeastern Missouri, Southern Illinois, Western and Central Kentucky and Southern Indiana, with a Moderate Risk in the areas surrounding that, including Eastern and Central Arkansas, Northern Mississippi, Northeastern Alabama, Central Tennessee, Central Kentucky, Southeastern Ohio, Central Indiana, Central Illinois and Southeast Central Missouri.  There is a Slight Risk of severe weather from Eastern Texas through the Eastern Great Lakes

A Major Tornado Outbreak is forecast later today and tonight over portions of the Mid-Mississippi and Lower Ohio Valleys.

This is the same storm that yesterday produced 48 tornado reports, softball-sized hail, 80+ mph winds and at least 13 casualties across Kansas, Oklahoma and Northern Texas.

This is already a Particularly Dangerous Situation Tornado Watch issued for Southern Illinois, Southern Indiana, Western and Central Kentucky and Eastern Missouri.  Violent tornadoes, hail to 3 inches in diameter, wind gusts to 70 mph and dangerous lightning are possible.

If you live in these areas, make sure your weather radio is turned on and working.  If you don't have a weather radio, keep your radio or TV tuned to a local news station or monitor your local radar via the NWS web site or another weather site such as Weather Underground.

Tags:



Comments

( 4 pieces of cheese — Leave some cheese )
deffox
May. 25th, 2011 07:02 pm (UTC)
Hopefully it'll skip your place.

I used to use a weather radio, but found the warning distance too wide. On days of bad storms the thing would alarm every five minutes when each storm cell entered each county for a two county radius.
captpackrat
May. 25th, 2011 08:06 pm (UTC)
Was it a radio with SAME capability? These radios can be programmed to only alert for a specific county, not the entire area. Most can also be set to alarm for only certain kinds of alerts, so you don't get bothered about flood watches if you live on a hilltop, for instance.
deffox
May. 25th, 2011 08:31 pm (UTC)
I'm not sure what the radio was exactly. It was at the office. There didn't seem to be any way to program it. There were only a few buttons on it (on/off, silence, volume).
captpackrat
May. 25th, 2011 08:49 pm (UTC)
Yeah, that sounds like one of the older designs. The newer radios with Specific Area Message Encoding (SAME) are a lot more useful. Once programmed, it'll only go off if there's an alert within your county and will ignore everywhere else.
( 4 pieces of cheese — Leave some cheese )